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Section 13.2.2

Interrogative Sentences

Interrogative sentences ask questions. They may ask for informationor for confirmation or denial of a statement. They typically begin with a question word such aswhat, who, or how, or an auxiliaryverb such as do, can or would.


What was the universe like before it was expanding?

--"The Evolution of Science," Scientific American

Does some fine madness plague great artists?

--"Manic-Depressive Illness and Creativity," Scientific American


Be careful to distinguish between direct and indirect questions. Direct questions normally use inverted word order (verb before subject) and end with a question mark. The two preceding sentences from Scientific American are examples. Indirectquestions normally do not use inverted word order and do not end with a question mark.


Unacceptable

Modern telescopes on the ground and in space detect the light from galaxies billions oflight-years away, showing us what did the universe look like when it wasyoung?

Acceptable

Modern telescopes on the ground and in space detect the light from galaxies billions oflight-years away, showing us what the universe looked like when it wasyoung.

--"The Evolution of the Universe," Scientific American


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